Williams at the forefront of Wyoming’s clean energy initiative

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Williams is set to play a critical role in Wyoming’s carbon capture and storage efforts in a pivotal development for Wyoming’s clean energy landscape.

The Wyoming Energy Authority, funded by the office of Governor Mark Gordon, awarded Williams a $975,000 grant to study development of a saline CO2 storage hub near Williams’ Echo Springs gas plant in Wamsutter. The Echo Springs CarbonSAFE Storage Complex Feasibility Study aims to evaluate the feasibility of permanently storing CO2 safely in the region’s geological formations.

Williams, which has extensive operations in southern Wyoming, views this project as a crucial next step toward the establishment of a commercial-scale carbon capture and storage complex.

The feasibility study, in partnership with the University of Wyoming School of Energy Resources, will involve drilling a stratigraphic test well, developing a high-quality model and preparing foundational documents for an underground injection control class VI well. A class VI well, which is permitted by the Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality due to the state primacy granted by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), is specifically designed for the injection of carbon dioxide into deep subsurface formations for geologic sequestration purposes. These elements are essential for enabling further development of the site and ensuring the safe and effective storage of CO2.

“Williams is proud to be a part of this study, which is the critical next step toward the development of a commercial-scale carbon capture and storage complex adjacent to our natural gas processing assets in southern Wyoming,” said Brian Hlavinka, Vice President of New Energy Ventures at Williams.

He expressed optimism about the project’s outcome and highlighted the company’s drive to support Wyoming’s clean energy goals. The partnership between Williams and the University of Wyoming School of Energy Resources underscores a collaborative effort to advance sustainable energy solutions. The feasibility study aligns with Wyoming’s broader initiatives to address carbon emissions and promote responsible environmental stewardship.

The project promises a significant impact on the region and seeks to confirm that the reservoirs at Echo Springs can safely, securely and economically store CO2. The endeavor ensures greater than 99% permanence, enhancing storage efficiency and containment. Simultaneously, a robust commercial-scale monitoring, reporting and verification process for Echo Springs will be developed, reinforcing the project’s commitment to transparency and accountability.

“I’m optimistic about the outcome of this project and appreciate the ongoing partnership and support from the University of Wyoming’s research team and the state of Wyoming,” Hlavinka said.